Brewing Tea English tea drinking research methods History of Tea manners and etiquette tea customs Uncategorised

Two ladies and an officer seated at tea

Two ladies and an officer seated at tea, Oil on canvas, circa 1715. Thought to be painted in Britain, artist unknown, formerly attributed to the Dutch artist Nicolaes Verkolje (1673-1746). © Victoria &Albert Museum, London.
Two ladies and an officer seated at tea, Oil on canvas, circa 1715. Thought to be painted in Britain, artist unknown, formerly attributed to the Dutch artist Nicolaes Verkolje (1673-1746). © Victoria &Albert Museum, London.

 

“Today our table is empty except for two dishes of lump sugar. I suppose they need it because they make the tea so badly. Everyone at home knows you never use boiling water on green tea. The clay pot hates the way he is used with different types of tea. Apparently he’s the only tea pot here, and he endlessly cries how he’s lost all his friends, each of whom used to nurture their own type of tea. Everything is wasted on these people.

They’ve got the silver spoons out though, showing us off with the spoons and the sugar. I’ve noticed they don’t pour in any more tea once the spoon is left in the cup – quite tricky for me to balance upright with the spoon stem arching out – I’ve got a little chip where I fell once onto my side.

This is so boring. I do get tired of being held in different ways – it’s almost as though she worries if she is doing the right thing, Why worry what other people think when you can’t even make the tea properly?

I think they should have a party again with the special tea that made everyone so merry and pink. Perhaps they’re waiting until it gets even colder. Come on, this pretty dismal – let’s party – bring on the tea caudle!”

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